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Metrics of me, me, me!

As I work on MyFavorites, I brainstormed an outline of the metrics that people consciously and subconsciously gauge in Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, and Foursquare. Feel free to add other services in the comments section. These are essentially how people rank themselves and others for their entire profile and their individual actions [i.e. a tweet or a check-in].

Twitter

  • # retweets on an individual tweet
  • # followers
  • # tweets
  • # replies, and simply replying (*added by @esnagel)

Facebook

  • # likes + # comments on an individual status update
  • # friends
  • # of fans (if fan page)

Tumblr

  • # likes + # reblogs on individual posts
  • # followers

Foursquare

  • # points (this week; all-time high score) + leaderboard rank this week vs friends
  • badges
  • mayoral status (# of places)
  • [comments exist on check-ins, but I don’t think I’m notified when these occur. It is my belief that users share out to Facebook and Twitter if they want comments or replies]
  • [tips occur, but the user isn’t encouraged by points to add tips — otherwise likely bad data would flow in]
  • [there lacks a feedback loop for user tips. There is “I have done this”, which increases a number next to the tip. However, the tip originator is never notified of those, and there’s a disconnect, I feel it should say “I agree!” rather than “I have done this”]
  • [photos occur at places, but the user isn’t encouraged by points to add photos — otherwise likely bad data would flow in]

MyFavorites

  • # followers
  • # favorites
  • [there needs to be a feedback loop; if I share a favorite and someone likes it. Right now this can be done via ‘me too’.]
  • [Comments by users would be good too, to clarify or discuss the favorite. Right now, this is done via a ‘reply’ which doesn’t allow discussion. User could share out to twitter/fb to start conversation]
  • [‘me too’ was created as a 1-click method for adding more favorites by users]
  • http://twitter.com/esnagel Eric Nagel

    @replies on Twitter, too. Shows that what you’re saying sparks conversation